The purpose of this site is to collect lab research by medical doctors about herbs that are proven to treat illnesses and counter the false attacks on herbs by the medical industry and false claims by alternative medicine. I let the science tell the facts.
 
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Coenzyme CoQ10 Date Written 2007
Author Joe Holmes Date Revised 7-4-09

Ubiquinone, Ubiquinol, ubiquinone Q10, Q(10), coenzyme Q (CoQ) and several other variations)

Remarkable help for oxidative stress, heart repair and diabetics. No one with a diabetic or heart conditions should overlook this antioxidant.

This table gives a preview of the more detailed reports below. Scroll down to the full report to see the detailed information. (Webmaster's comments)
1 Thirty-eight CAD patients (33 M/5 F, mean age 55 +/- 4 years, ejection fraction 57.5 +/- 8%) were randomized into two groups. One group (n = 19) received CoQ(10) orally at doses of 300 mg/day for 1 month, whereas the other group received a placebo. On entry and after 1 month, all patients underwent brachial artery ED assessment, cardiopulmonary exercise test, and the measurement of endothelium-bound ecSOD activity. A total of 33 patients completed the study. ecSOD, ED relaxation, as well as peak VO(2) and O(2) pulse increases in the CoQ(10)-treated group were statistically greater vs. the variations in the placebo group. In particular, improvements elicited by CoQ(10) supplementation were remarkable... (double blind test shows remarkable heart improvment)
2 a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial showed that thioctic acid at an oral dosage of 800 mg/day for 4 months significantly improved cardiac autonomic neuropathy in type 2 diabetic patients. Above all, individuals with diabetes should be educated about the importance of consuming adequate amounts of vitamins and minerals from natural food sources, within the constraints of recommended sugar and carbohydrate intake. (800 mg a day for 4 months improved neuropathy in diabetics)
3 In this study, the antioxidants coenzyme Q10 and lipoic acid were able to block IL-1beta-mediated inhibition of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from islet cells at... (reduces oxidation and stimulated increased insulin)
4 A total of 33 patients completed the study. ecSOD, ED relaxation, as well as peak VO(2) and O(2) pulse increases in the CoQ(10)-treated group were statistically greater vs. the variations in the placebo group. In particular, improvements elicited by CoQ(10) supplementation were remarkable in subjects presenting low initial endothelium-bound ecSOD and thus more prone to oxidative stress. (human doubl blind test shows impromement in the heart)

1. Effect of coenzyme Q10 administration on endothelial function and extracellular superoxide dismutase in patients with ischaemic heart disease: a double-blind, randomized controlled study. Tiano L, Belardinelli R, Carnevali P, Principi F, Seddaiu G, Littarru GP.Institute of Biochemistry, Polytechnic University of the Marche, Via Ranieri, 60100 Ancona, Italy. luca.tiano@unicam.it

AIMS: This randomized controlled study was designed to determine whether oral coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10)) supplementation (100 mg tid) was able to improve extracellular superoxide dismutase (ecSOD) activity and endothelium-dependent (ED) vasodilation in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). ecSOD, a major antioxidant enzyme system of the vessel wall, is reduced in patients with CAD. Moreover, there is a strong correlation between endothelium-bound ecSOD and the ED dilation of conduit arteries. CoQ(10) has been recently shown to improve the ED relaxation in diabetic patients. METHODS AND RESULTS: Thirty-eight CAD patients (33 M/5 F, mean age 55 +/- 4 years, ejection fraction 57.5 +/- 8%) were randomized into two groups. One group (n = 19) received CoQ(10) orally at doses of 300 mg/day for 1 month, whereas the other group received a placebo. On entry and after 1 month, all patients underwent brachial artery ED assessment, cardiopulmonary exercise test, and the measurement of endothelium-bound ecSOD activity. A total of 33 patients completed the study. ecSOD, ED relaxation, as well as peak VO(2) and O(2) pulse increases in the CoQ(10)-treated group were statistically greater vs. the variations in the placebo group. In particular, improvements elicited by CoQ(10) supplementation were remarkable in subjects presenting low initial endothelium-bound ecSOD and thus more prone to oxidative stress. CONCLUSION: Improvements in the ED relaxation and endothelium-bound ecSOD activity might be related to CoQ(10) capability of enhancing endothelial functionality by counteracting nitric oxide oxidation. The enhancement of peak VO(2) and of O(2) pulse is likely due to the bioenergetic effect of CoQ(10); on the other end, the improved VO(2) could also depend on the observed enhanced peripheral endothelial function. PMID: 17644511 (1)

2. "The role of antioxidant micronutrients in the prevention of diabetic complications. Bonnefont-Rousselot D.Laboratoire de Biochimie Métabolique et Clinique (EA 3617), Faculté de Pharmacie, Paris, France. dominique.rousselot@psl.ap-hop-paris.fr

Diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased production of reactive oxygen species and a reduction in antioxidant defenses. This leads to oxidative stress, which is partly responsible for diabetic complications. Tight glycemic control is the most effective way of preventing or decreasing these complications. Nevertheless, antioxidant micronutrients can be proposed as adjunctive therapy in patients with diabetes. Indeed, some minerals and vitamins are able to indirectly participate in the reduction of oxidative stress in diabetic patients by improving glycemic control and/or are able to exert antioxidant activity. This article reviews the use of minerals (vanadium, chromium, magnesium, zinc, selenium, copper) and vitamins or cofactors (tocopherol [vitamin E], ascorbic acid [vitamin C], ubidecarenone [ubiquinone; coenzyme Q], nicotinamide, riboflavin, thioctic acid [lipoic acid], flavonoids) in diabetes, with a particular focus on the prevention of diabetic complications. Results show that dietary supplementation with micronutrients may be a complement to classical therapies for preventing and treating diabetic complications. Supplementation is expected to be more effective when a deficiency in these micronutrients exists. Nevertheless, many clinical studies have reported beneficial effects in individuals without deficiencies, although several of these studies were short term and had small sample sizes. However, a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial showed that thioctic acid at an oral dosage of 800 mg/day for 4 months significantly improved cardiac autonomic neuropathy in type 2 diabetic patients. Above all, individuals with diabetes should be educated about the importance of consuming adequate amounts of vitamins and minerals from natural food sources, within the constraints of recommended sugar and carbohydrate intake." PMID:15743112 (2)

3. "Effects of antioxidants coenzyme Q10 and lipoic acid on interleukin-1 beta-mediated inhibition of glucose-stimulated insulin release from cultured mouse pancreatic islets. Schroeder MM, Belloto RJ Jr, Hudson RA, McInerney MF. Department of Medicinal and Biological Chemistry, College of Pharmacy, University of Toledo, BO 2833, MS# 606, 2801 W. Bancroft St., Toledo, OH"43606-3390, USA.

During the development of the autoimmune disease, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) islet cell death is thought to be mediated in part by oxygen and nitrogen free radicals and interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta), secreted by activated macrophages. Free radicals disrupt the homeostasis of biological systems by damaging major constituent molecules such as lipids, proteins, and DNA. Islet cells are quite susceptible to oxidative damage due to low levels of antioxidant enzymes involved in free radical consumption. If IDDM is associated with an imbalance of oxidative stresses and antioxidant responses in islet cells, then it may be possible to ameliorate disease by supplementating antioxidant defenses. In this study, the antioxidants coenzyme Q10 and lipoic acid were able to block IL-1beta-mediated inhibition of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from islet cells at 10(-12) M and 10(-9) M, respectively." PMID: 15803864 (3)


4. "The role of antioxidant micronutrients in the prevention of diabetic complications. Bonnefont-Rousselot D.Laboratoire de Biochimie Métabolique et Clinique (EA 3617), Faculté de Pharmacie, Paris, France. dominique.rousselot@psl.ap-hop-paris.fr

Diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased production of reactive oxygen species and a reduction in antioxidant defenses. This leads to oxidative stress, which is partly responsible for diabetic complications. Tight glycemic control is the most effective way of preventing or decreasing these complications. Nevertheless, antioxidant micronutrients can be proposed as adjunctive therapy in patients with diabetes. Indeed, some minerals and vitamins are able to indirectly participate in the reduction of oxidative stress in diabetic patients by improving glycemic control and/or are able to exert antioxidant activity. This article reviews the use of minerals (vanadium, chromium, magnesium, zinc, selenium, copper) and vitamins or cofactors (tocopherol [vitamin E], ascorbic acid [vitamin C], ubidecarenone [ubiquinone; coenzyme Q], nicotinamide, riboflavin, thioctic acid [lipoic acid], flavonoids) in diabetes, with a particular focus on the prevention of diabetic complications. Results show that dietary supplementation with micronutrients may be a complement to classical therapies for preventing and treating diabetic complications. Supplementation is expected to be more effective when a deficiency in these micronutrients exists. Nevertheless, many clinical studies have reported beneficial effects in individuals without deficiencies, although several of these studies were short term and had small sample sizes. However, a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial showed that thioctic acid at an oral dosage of 800 mg/day for 4 months significantly improved cardiac autonomic neuropathy in type 2 diabetic patients. Above all, individuals with diabetes should be educated about the importance of consuming adequate amounts of vitamins and minerals from natural food sources, within the constraints of recommended sugar and carbohydrate intake.

PMID: 15743112

 

1

PMID: 17644511

2 PMID: 15743112
3 PMID: 15803864
4 PMID: 15743112
   
   
   
 
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