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Serratiopeptidase also known as Serrapeptase Date Written 2007
Author Joe Holmes Date Revised  

Serrapeptase is best known for its pain relief properties, anti-inflammitory, and destroying pathogens. It is suggested to be able to kill lyme, fungus and unfriendly bacteria. This means this enzyme can greatly strengthen the immune system. This enzyme is naturally processed commercially today through fermentation and was first discovered in the silkworm intestine.

This table gives a preview of the more detailed reports below. Scroll down to the full report to see the detailed information. (Webmaster's comments)
1 Serrapeptase is an anti-inflammatory
2 These cell-surface proteins are known to function as ligands in the interaction between these bacteria and their host cells, and our data suggest that treatment with this natural enzyme may provide a useful tool in the prevention of the initial adhesion of L. monocytogenes to the human gut. (treatment for Lysteria and is an anti inflamitroy agent)
3 CONCLUSIONS: Serratiopeptidase was effective for eradicating infection caused by biofilm-forming bacteria in this experimental animal model. The antibiofilm property of the enzyme may enhance antibiotic efficacy in the treatment of staphylococcal infections, (Serrapeptase inhibits inflammation and kills pathogens)
4 There was a significant reduction in the extent of cheek swelling and pain intensity in the serrapeptase group (double blind test on humans shows it reduces infection when used for tooth extraction patients)
   


1. Quantitation of serrapeptase in formulations by UV method in the microplate format. Sandhya KV, Devi SG, Mathew ST.ICMR, Dept of Pharmaceutics, Al-Ameen College of Pharmacy, Hosur Road, Bangalore-560027, India. sandhyabalraj@yahoo.com

Serrapeptase is an anti-inflammatory, proteolytic enzyme isolated from the microorganism, Serratia sp. HY-6. Very few methods are available for the quantification of serrapeptase. The activity of the enzyme is determined by an ELISA assay, colorimetric method using casein as substrate or by HPLC method. These methods are lengthy, time consuming and require a number of reagents and solvents. Therefore an attempt was made to develop a simple alternative method for regular estimation of drug in formulations. Serrapeptase enzyme was estimated in formulations by using microplate readers which uses the principle of vertical photometry. Further this method was validated and the robustness of this method was checked by estimating the drug in various formulations including liposomes and marketed tablet formulations. A linear relationship between drug concentration and absorbance was observed between 1-4 microg/ml at 230 nm (R(2)=0.9911). The percentage recovery values of the drug in serrapeptase liposomes were found to lie within the standard limit (97-98%) which confirms the method is accurate and free from any positive or negative interference of the excipient. The low value of standard deviation obtained confirms the precision of the method. (+/-0.020 - +/-0.044). The drug content values in marketed tablets values obtained matched the label claim. The proposed microplate UV-method for determination of serrapeptase in formulations is novel, simple, inexpensive, fast, specific and robust. Thus this method could be a better alternative for regular estimation of drug in the various marketed formulations of serrapeptase." PMID: 18855600 (1)

2. " Protease treatment affects both invasion ability and biofilm formation in Listeria monocytogenes. Longhi C, Scoarughi GL, Poggiali F, Cellini A, Carpentieri A, Seganti L, Pucci P, Amoresano A, Cocconcelli PS, Artini M, Costerton JW, Selan L.Department of Public Health Sciences, University La Sapienza, Piazzale Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome, Italy.

Listeria monocytogenes is a notably invasive bacterium associated with life-threatening food-borne disease in humans. Several surface proteins have been shown to be essential in the adhesion of L. monocytogenes, and in the subsequent invasion of phagocytes. Because the control of the invasion of host cells by Listeria could potentially hinder its spread in the infected host, we have examined the effects of a protease treatment on the ability of L. monocytogenes to form biofilms and to invade tissues. We have chosen serratiopeptidase (SPEP), an extracellular metalloprotease produced by Serratia marcescens that is already widely used as an anti-inflammatory agent, and has been shown to modulate adhesin expression and to induce antibiotic sensitivity in other bacteria. Treatment of L. monocytogenes with sublethal concentrations of SPEP reduced their ability to form biofilms and to invade host cells. Zymograms of the treated cells revealed that Ami4b autolysin, internalinB, and ActA were sharply reduced. These cell-surface proteins are known to function as ligands in the interaction between these bacteria and their host cells, and our data suggest that treatment with this natural enzyme may provide a useful tool in the prevention of the initial adhesion of L. monocytogenes to the human gut." PMID: 18479885 (2)

3. "The effect of proteolytic enzyme serratiopeptidase in the treatment of experimental implant-related infection. Mecikoglu M, Saygi B, Yildirim Y, Karadag-Saygi E, Ramadan SS, Esemenli T.Animal Research Laboratory, Marmara University School of Medicine, Istanbul, Turkey.

BACKGROUND: Infection around an implanted orthopaedic device is a devastating complication, and the treatment of infections involving slime-forming bacteria is especially difficult. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a proteolytic enzyme, serratiopeptidase, in the eradication of a periprosthetic infection in an in vivo animal model. METHODS: In sixty Sprague-Dawley rats, the medullary canal of the right femur was drilled through the intercondylar notch and was inoculated with a Staphylococcus epidermidis strain (ATCC 35984) with a high slime-producing capacity. The cavity was filled with polymethylmethacrylate cement, and a Kirschner wire that had contact with the knee joint was inserted. None of the animals received any treatment for two weeks. Twenty rats were killed at two weeks after the inoculation in order to determine if the infection had become established. The remaining forty rats were randomized into two groups. One group received serratiopeptidase enzyme injections into the knee joint in addition to antibiotic therapy for four weeks, and the other group received intra-articular saline solution injections together with the same antibiotic therapy. The animals from both groups were killed two weeks after the end of therapy (on Day 56). The knee specimens were evaluated bacteriologically and histologically to determine the prevalence of persistent infection and the effects of the enzyme on local tissue. RESULTS: At two weeks, inoculated bacteria grew on culture of specimens from twelve (63.2%) of nineteen animals in the no-treatment group. Microbiological testing suggested that infection persisted in only one (5.6%) of eighteen animals in the serratiopeptidase-and-antibiotic group, whereas it was present in six (37.5%) of sixteen animals in the antibiotic-only group (p = 0.001). Histological evaluation showed similar results (kappa = 0.92). CONCLUSIONS: Serratiopeptidase was effective for eradicating infection caused by biofilm-forming bacteria in this experimental animal model. The antibiofilm property of the enzyme may enhance antibiotic efficacy in the treatment of staphylococcal infections." PMID: 16757752 (3)

4.
"Effect of the proteolytic enzyme serrapeptase on swelling, pain and trismus after surgical extraction of mandibular third molars.
Al-Khateeb TH, Nusair Y.Division of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Dentistry, Jordan University of Science and Technology and King Abdulla University Hospital, Irbid, Jordan. taiseerhhk@yahoo.com

The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of serrapeptase to reduce postoperative swelling, pain and trismus after third molar surgery. Twenty-four healthy individuals with symmetrically impacted mandibular third molars underwent surgical removal in a prospective, intra-individual, randomized, double-blind, cross-over study. Teeth were removed in 2 sessions by the same surgeon. At each session, one third molar was removed under local anaesthesia via a buccal osteotomy. All patients received a combination of either serrapeptase 5mg or placebo tablets and 1000 mg paracetamol tablets at either the 1st or 2nd operation in accordance with the randomization plan. Cheek thickness, pain and interincisal distance were measured preoperatively, and on the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 7th postoperative days. Cheek thickness and maximum interincisal distance were measured using calipers. Pain intensity was assessed clinically using a numeric scale. There was a significant reduction in the extent of cheek swelling and pain intensity in the serrapeptase group at the 2nd, 3rd and 7th postoperative days (P<0.05), but no significant difference in mean maximal interincisal distance was found between the 2 groups (P>0.05)." PMID: 18272344 (4)

1 PMID: 18855600
2 PMID: 18479885
3 PMID: 16757752
4 PMID: 18272344
   
   
   
   
   

 

 
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